Hacking Chinese

A better way of learning Mandarin

Articles tagged with ‘WordSwing’

  1. Text adventure games and how to use them in the Chinese language classroom

    Interactive text games work well for individual learners, but they are also excellent in a classroom setting. This article gives you everything you need as a teacher to play Escape! in your classroom. A Chinese version of this article is available as well.

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  2. Reading is a lot like spaced repetition, only better

    Learning vocabulary through reading and by using spaced repetition software are both common strategies employed by students learning Chinese, but which one is the most efficient? In this guest article, Kevin Bullaughey from WordSwing compares the two methods in terms of exposure and coverage.

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  3. New text game for Chinese learners: The Magistrate’s Gallery

    The Magistrate’s Gallery is a new interactive text game for Chinese learners. A man knocks on your door with an unusual problem: his daughter has been trapped inside one of the paintings in the magistrate’s gallery. But which one? And how can you get her out? To rescue her, you will need to travel into the paintings and unravel the story about how the girl ended up there.

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  4. Five text games for Chinese learners

    This article is about five text games for Chinese learners. It both introduces the games and asks for feedback about how they can become even more engaging and fun. Each game contains on average roughly 10,000 characters, which makes them on par with a typical graded reader.

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  5. Let’s play 迷霧中 (Into the Haze)

    Let’s play 迷霧中 (Into the Haze)! In this post, I share a video where I play a small part of the game, summarising and commenting on what’s going on in English (the game is of course in Mandarin).

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  6. Into the Haze: A new text adventure game for Chinese learners

    Into the Haze is an interactive text adventure game for Chines learners. Your brother is missing and you need to enter a city covered in a poisonous haze to find him. The story is presented through text and audio, and depending on your choices, the game will develop differently. If you make bad choices, perhaps because you didn’t fully understand the options, you might fail and will have to try again. Good luck!

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  7. Introducing Chinese quiz tournaments on WordSwing

    Playing games, especially with other people in a situation of friendly competition, is a great way of boosting motivation. This post introduces a first version of a Chinese quiz tournament (free) that Kevin and I have created over at WordSwing.

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  8. Escape: A text adventure game for Chinese learners

    Escape is a text game for Chinese learners. It works like a graded reader with level-adjusted content, except that it’s also interactive! You have been captured and need to escape. To do this, you need to understand what happens and make the right choices based on what you read.

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  9. The Hacking Chinese tone training course

    Learning to hear the difference between tones is difficult for many learners. Research shows that speaker variability and a systematic and predictable approach are key to overcoming the problem. With this article, I launch a tone training course, which is meant to provide you with just that. For free!

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