Hacking Chinese

A better way of learning Mandarin

Chinese listening challenge, January 2020

listening-challengeHacking Chinese Challenges are about building language skills through daily practice and friendly competition. By focusing on one specific area of learning over a limited period of time, you will be able to learn more!

I regard listening as the most important skill when learning Chinese. It has more positive carry-over to the other skills than anything else, and improving listening ability also makes it much easier to socialise in Chinese. This is your chance to ramp up your Chinese listening practice!

Chinese listening challenge, January 2020

Join by following these steps:

  1. Sign-up (free)
  2. View current and upcoming challenges on the front page
  3. Join the listening challenge
  4. Set a reasonable goal (see below)
  5. Report your progress on your computer or mobile device
  6. Check the graph to see if you’re on track to reaching your goal
  7. Check the leader board to see how you compare to others
  8. Share progress, tips and resources with fellow students

Please note:  The challenge starts on January 10th, so if you join before then, you won’t be able to report progress until the challenge starts.

What should you listen to?

Start by looking here:

  1. The 10 best free listening resource collections for learning Chinese I wrote this article in connection with the previous challenge. It’s a collection of podcasts, radio shows and much more. Note that I have excluded any paid resources in this post.
  2. Hacking Chinese Resources The resource section of Hacking Chinese currently contains 116 resources tagged with “listening”. Many of them are resource collections, where you can find hundreds or even thousands of clips. First select your proficiency level and then listening.

If you have other resources that aren’t shared here already, please leave a comment or contact me in some other way. Here are some recommendations:

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

How and why you should listen

I’ve written a lot about improving listening ability in Chinese. Most importantly, you should check my series about listening strategies:

Setting a reasonable goal

It’s hard to know what a reasonable goal is for you, but i think anyone who’s interested in joining should aim for at least ten hours of listening. That’s  about 30 minutes per day.

If this isn’t your first challenge or you spend a significant amount of your time learning Chinese, aim for at least twice that, i.e. twenty hours. That’s still “only” about an hour per day, which isn’t that much if you spread it out.

How high you want to go is up to you, but an hour per day on average is not ridiculous. In previous listening challenges, some participants have clocked over 100 hours in one month! Can you beat that?

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Preliminary challenge schedule for 2020

Here is a preliminary list of challenges for 2020, but I’m always open for ideas. Based on user participation, surveys as well as my own opinion, reading and listening challenges are particularly helpful for a large number of people, followed by those focusing on vocabulary. These will recur more often throughout the year, with other, more specific challenges spread out in-between.

Challenges will last four roughly three weeks. They always start on the 10th each month and lasts until the end of that month. Three weeks is enough to get a significant amount of studying done, but not so long that people lose focus. This also leaves ten days of breathing space between challenges.

  1. January: Listening
  2. February: Writing
  3. March: Reading
  4. April: Vocabulary
  5. May: Listening
  6. June: Speaking
  7. July: Reading
  8. August: Translation
  9. September: Listening
  10. October: Vocabulary
  11. November: Reading
  12. December: Pronunciation

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One comment

  1. Ben Parker says:

    圆桌派 is a similar show to 锵锵三人行, also good.

    For intermediate-advanced learners trying to make the jump from instruction content to native content, I also recommend the podcast 狗熊有话说。It often takes the form of a book review of a book originally published in English, so conceptually can be easy to follow along with. He also often does a follow-up version of the same podcast in English.

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