Hacking Chinese

A better way of learning Mandarin

Articles tagged with ‘Attitude’

  1. Change your attitude to enjoy life and learn more Chinese

    Attitude is one of the key factors when learning a language as well as for life in general. This article is about how a change of perspective can turn negative situations into learning opportunities and become a happier person overall.

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  2. Hacking Chinese: Contradictory and provoking?

    This article is a reflection on my own writing on Hacking Chinese. I sometimes deliberately contradict myself, exaggerate a certain point or approach a question from a certain perspective. In short, critical thinking is essential, regardless if you read my articles or listen to other people’s advice.

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  3. Have fun learning Chinese or else…

    Having fun while learning, or at least making the best of every situation, is essential. Learning a language requires a lot of time and if we don’t enjoy the process, we aren’t likely to invest the time we need to master a language.

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  4. Language is communication, not only an abstract subject to study

    I won’t join the group of language bloggers who claim that classroom learning is meaningless, but I do believe there are good reasons to create links to the real world. Not only is this a motivational booster, it’s also an excellent way of identifying problems you might have with your Chinese.

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  5. The 10,000 hour rule – Blood, sweat and tears

    The 10,000 hour rule is quite simple. It states that it takes roughly 10,000 hours of practice to become really good at something. The most important lesson here is that talent is far less important that people think. Even towering geniuses work very hard. Blood, sweat and tears are what counts in the end, not talent.

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  6. Understanding regionally accented Mandarin

    Learning to understand regionally accented Mandarin is essential. Very few people speak perfectly standard Mandarin and it’s your responsibility to understand what they’re saying, not theirs to speak so you understand. This article delves deeper into the whys and hows of learning regionally accented Mandarin.

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  7. Advancing in spite of praise

    Praise is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it’s encouraging and makes it more rewarding to study. On the other hand, however, if you use other people’s praise as a true indication of your own ability, you’re in deep trouble. Feel encouraged, but it’s essential that you don’t trust native speakers when they tell you your Chinese is great!

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  8. Enjoying the journey while focusing on the destination

    Everybody has different reasons for studying Chinese, but whatever the final goal is, it is important to make the journey interesting as well. Enjoying studying isn’t simply a cliché, it’s quite necessary if you want to invest the time needed to master a language. This article discusses the journey, the destination and the relationship between them. To but it briefly: don’t forget to look at the view.

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  9. Achieving the impossible by being inspired

    Teaching and inspiring are two closely related things. If you can see all superiors as sources of inspiration and knowledge, you will advance faster than if you view them as rivals or opponents. Similarly, realise that you have your own strong sides that inspire other people. Don’t hesitate to teach others if they want to be taught. Inspiration is cyclic in its nature and should flow freely in all directions.

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  10. Don’t be a tourist

    A tourist is someone who, when going abroad, takes a small piece of his country with him and stays therein. Learning Chinese as a tourist is very hard and quite inefficient. Being a tourist is not about the stated purpose of your stay, it’s about your attitude, which is why there are people who have lived in China for ages without actually learning Chinese. Stop being a tourist, step outside your comfort zone and learn Chinese!

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